Request a copy of a book


Newham Bookshop logo (2015)

Open Tuesday to Saturday from
10 am to 5 pm.

We can send books by post, usually £3 in the UK.
Newham Bookshop logo (2015) The Wanstead Tap logo
Newham Bookshop events at The Wanstead Tap, Spring 2024
  • Thursday 7 Mar at 7.30 pm

    Jon Cruddas
    A Century of Labour

  • Saturday 9 Mar at 7.30 pm

    Michael Rosen
    Going Through It

  • Tuesday 12 Mar at 7.30 pm

    Mary McGlory & Sylvia Saunders: The Liverbirds

  • Thursday 14 Mar at 7.30 pm

    Lynne Jones: Sorry for the Inconvenience…

  • Wednesday 20 March at 7.30 pm

    Ladies Who London LIVE!
    with Leo Hollis: Inheritance

  • Thursday 18 April at 7.30 pm

    Sarah Wise
    The Undesirables

  • Thursday 25 April at 7.30 pm

    Andrew Whitehead
    A Devilish Kind Of Courage




Newham Bookshop by Pete Fallan
Newham Bookshop, Pete Fallan, March 2021.


Order a copy of Butler to the World
Please select:
Butler to the World by Oliver Bullough
Butler to the World is published by Profile Books in hardback at £20.

Oliver Bullough

Butler to the World

How Britain became the Servant of Tycoons, Tax Dodgers, Kleptocrats and Criminals

The Sunday Times bestselling author Oliver Bullough reveals the scandalous reality of Britain’s new position in the world.

The Suez Crisis of 1956 was Britain’s twentieth-century nadir, the moment when the once superpower was bullied into retreat. In the immortal words of former US Secretary of State Dean Acheson, “Britain has lost an empire and not yet found a role.” But the funny thing was, Britain had already found a role. It even had the costume. The leaders of the world just hadn’t noticed it yet.

Butler to the World reveals how the UK took up its position at the elbow of the worst people on Earth: the oligarchs, kleptocrats and gangsters. We pride ourselves on values of fair play and the rule of law, but few countries do more to frustrate global anti-corruption efforts. We are now a nation of Jeeveses, snobbish enablers for rich halfwits of considerably less charm than Bertie Wooster. It doesn’t have to be that way.

“Brilliant.” — Marina Hyde, The Guardian.

“A savage analysis of Britain’s soul. As essential as Orwell at his best.” — Peter Pomerantsev.

“Horribly brilliant.” — James O’Brien.