Newham Bookshop logo 1978-2018

Monday 18 June at 7 pm at Conway Hall

Shore 2 Shore

Shore 2 Shore

with

Carol Ann Duffy

Gillian Clarke, Imtiaz Dharker, Jackie Kay and Maura Dooley, with music by John Sampson

An evening of readings by some of the
finest poets at work today. More details…

Newham Bookshop line drawing

Newham Bookshop celebrates
40 years’ trading, 1978-2018

Maps of London & Beyond

Thursday 21 June at 7.30 pm at The Wanstead Tap

Adam Dant
Maps of London & Beyond

Newham Bookshop

745-747 Barking Road
London E13 9ER
Telephone: 020 8552 9993
info@newhambooks.co.uk
www.newhambooks.co.uk
Twitter blue bird logo @NewhamBookshop
Tuesday – Friday
9.30 am – 5 pm
Saturday 10 am – 5 pm


Thursday 30 October
at 7.30 pm at
Bishopsgate Institute

Bishopsgate Institute logo

Tickets £12,
£10 concessions, from
Bishopsgate Institute
Tel 020 7392 9200
or online.

Cover of The Girl Next Door
The Girl Next Door
is published by
Hutchinson
in hardback at
£18.99
Ruth Rendell

Ruth Rendell
50 years of Wexford

Veteran crime writer Ruth Rendell celebrates 50 years of Inspector Wexford books, and discusses her new novel The Girl Next Door.

Claire Hazelton wrote in The Observer: “Shortly before the second world war, a man nicknamed Woody murders his wife and his wife’s lover. In an act of psychopathy, he cuts off the couple’s hands and buries them, in a cookie jar, in tunnels that the local children play in. Veteran crime writer Ruth Rendell’s new novel, The Girl Next Door, is strangely detached from the crime it opens with. Set 70 years later, when the hands of the victims are unearthed, it focuses not on the murder but on the children — now elderly — who are reunited by the resulting criminal investigation. Although mysteries from their pasts are revealed as memories are pieced together, Rendell is more interested in the new relationships formed within the group.

“Instead of exploring psychopathy as one might have expected, Rendell gives an acutely observed portrayal of old age through her characters’ regrets, losses and bewilderment. Her realism renders the novel bleak at times but moving too. Difficult themes such as death, usually dressed up in mystery in a crime novel, are real, hard-hitting and constant.”